Rescue Remedies Diary November 2021 - January 2022

A behind the scenes look at our work
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Rescue Remedies
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Rescue Remedies Diary November 2021 - January 2022

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Falling Stars and Bangs in the night
This year November the 5th fell on a Friday, so then we had a double Fireworks bonanza Friday and Saturday both. At the kennels tonight we have sprayed all our kennels with a special spray Charlie made up which smells very therapeutic! Charlie sprayed all the kennels yesterday. In truth most dogs are really settled I have just let Mika out as he wasn't and he was happier having got the gist of what was going on and where. As I walked to the car I witnessed the kennels on the side of the house to be very calm and saw Buds fast asleep under his heat lamp...
Tye
Tye
We have had a really good week as we move into November. The chill factor is there in the air especially in the morning. We are full with a very high demand for any kennel space we can find. There is a tremendous need out there at the moment but as always we have to service dogs in pounds who have no one to accommodate them as their time is running out. We are up to date with Homing Questionnaires thanks to the diligence of the Homing Team. We are delving into any hopefuls which appear to meet the needs of our dogs.
Sully on the Climbing frame
Sully on the Climbing frame
Tommy Using the climbing frame
Tommy Using the climbing frame
For people who haven't visited our Kennels where the Rescue boards their dogs it is such a lovely experience for walkers and especially our dogs. We have 6 large grass paddocks. We have just bought secure fences which will improve our paddocks come the spring. 2 large paddocks exclusively for the walkers use, during the day from 10 until 4pm. They have a supply of toys, a water source, seating for the walkers to rest and a paddling pool in the summer, a climbing structure with tunnel and also some agility equipment which some walkers make use of. The 4 large paddocks close to the kennels are used by the staff to give our dogs timeout and relief. They can watch the world go by and many of them sit down, or pick up smells or have a run with a ball or toys. We have a surrounding woods with a stream so dogs who are getting used to walking on a lead can feel free and safe without off lead dogs around. In the woods we have a little island with a bench for quiet time and a cuddle hut which we called the poets hut with a sofa and can be used as a destination if its raining. We have picnic tables and bench scattered around. We closed it for Covid and hope, all things being well, to open it in the spring. Adjacent to the kennel we have another private wood rarely used by the public. Further a field we have long walks with streams and bridges and wooded area. We also have a walk into the village and around. Each dog is assessed for toys , bedding needs and dietary needs and sensitivity to neighbours on entry. The staff have 50 dog's needs to accommodate so we are always tweaking and making sure long stay and needy dogs needs are reviewed and met. We get so many donations and have ample toys, treats, different types of beds and bedding. We always ask for financial donations via our bank account with Giftaid if possible to help us meet out bills and this is the message we need to state over the Christmas period as to be truth our dogs are very well served and want for nothing. The regime at the kennels carefully dovetails the staff specific activities and walks with the volunteers activities and walks. Volunteers help to clear up after the dogs, bath dogs, groom dogs and it feels like a team all working to meet the dog's needs. We have a large covered area for volunteers to sign in and record their walks. It is a shelter also during rain and showers. Volunteers have free access to tea and coffee. Each dog has a write up giving guidance which is reviewed and often tweaked each week, and is displayed and all walkers are asked to read before their walk with each dog and to feedback to senior members if further thoughts and clarification.
Florence Semi Feral Cat we are hoping to find her home
Florence Semi Feral Cat we are hoping to find her home
My mother is bedbound and can't really move. She has excellent carers and now my Brother and his family have moved nearby so it was lovely to meet him and Leslee today at Joycee's and share news. Most of the time Joycee sleeps.
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xxlynne
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Re: Rescue Remedies Diary November 2021 - January 2022

Post by xxlynne »

Statistics of our Longstay friends
A Longstay dog's definition is over 6 months stay, SINCE they came into us either originally or were returned after at least 2 weeks in a homing.

Having reviewed our Longstays dog's in May 21 over a 2-3 year period our statistics revealed we have had 50 Longstay dogs consistently with a diminishing overall number of dogs on our books. During the past 4 years we have lost the use of 3 kennels and now have the one site.

Numbers of Friends on our books
Nov 17 100
Nov 18 95
Nov 19 101
Nov 20 66
Nov 21 77 we have currently 40 Longstay dogs.


Today I did a review out of curiosity and our statistics look like this:
We have 37 dogs who have been with us less than 6 months
We have 15 dogs who have been with us between 6 months and 1 year.
We have 25 dogs who have been with us longer than a year. This includes 11 dogs who have been with us longer than 2 years

Our longest stay 5 dogs are Shadow; Mandy; Kami; Buddy and Genie.
Shadow
Shadow
Kami & Genie
Kami & Genie
Mandy
Mandy
Buddy
Buddy
We have taken TimmyTim off our books as our longest longest stay as Timmy has been in permanent foster for over 18 months and will be staying with Barry.

We are really pleased to note over the last 6 months we have homed
5 dogs who had stayed over 6 months namely Bluey Amb: Eddy TR: BuskyBear RR: Shelley RR: Bobby RR:

9 dogs who had stayed over 1 year Summer SR: Kirby RR: Basil TR: Ollie RR: Toby (Cody) Amb: Buds SR: Henry RR: Hugo (Yoda) RR PLUS TIGGA TR!!! (ADDED LATER MY BRAIN KEPT TELLING ME WE HAD ANOTHER CELEBRATION! wOKE UP THIS MORNING AND TIGGA CAME IN MY MIND)
Summer
Summer
Ollie
Ollie
Buds
Buds
Such is the high calibre of our homes / families, they made their homings look so simple and natural. We are forever indebted to these families.

As a Rescue we step forwards for the dogs who are losing or at high risk of losing their lives. It is a fantastic experience to see how we as a TEAM help these dogs to unpack their baggage and begin to believe in themselves and gain the confidence and skills to become special additions to their families.
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xxlynne
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Re: Rescue Remedies Diary November 2021 - January 2022

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Kennel Design:
This is an aspect I have studied deeply over the last 15 years having had our dogs in 9 kennels, each having different eras of kennels within their complex and also visiting many kennels to collect dogs coming into our care.

The principal concern is our dog's care, their sensory input and sense of security and safety. Ease of accessibility and a balance of exposure to the milieu of life and the ability to have privacy when sort: I now own my own kennels and have been rebuilding them for over 4 years and started out with clear principles and have learnt and improved our ideas along the way. Buying kennel units tend to be steel cubicles. These are terrible in my view for heat conduction (hot in summer and cold in winter) but also for sound conduction which is a huge factor in kennels.

The key principle aspects and considerations you are looking for in kennels are
Light during the day. Ultra violet shielding translucent roofing giving light to the kennel runs. Windows double glazed to cut sound conduction and retain warmth in the evening. Light entering during the day
Air flow This is key as air must move freely and winds must be dissipated without causing damage through the roof lifting to release and the grids at the sides. Air movement is very important especially in the bed areas dispelling toileting smells so hence the grid gates and side panels for air freshness.
Shelter extremes of temperature, from winds, sun, frosts, rain.
Space The size of the bed area and run area is very important and given space any dog feels more comfortable
Visibility So dogs need to and can explore and be aware of activity around them NOT based on sound alone. Where visual barriers are present dogs start to jump in an attempt to see and understand movement sounds abut also bark more to communicate within the community added to through boredom. Most of decisions within the kennels are made also around Staff visability: They must be able to witness and identify what is going on within the kennels.
Temperature control and conduction I prefer a basic brick structure. Brick absorbs heat and yet presents never more than warm and retains that temperature so as the weather changes i.e. as it gets cold at night the walls retain that warmth and shield and lift the air temperature. In winter evenings the heat lamps create a lovely glow and build up the temperature as the night temperature outside is dropping. We hang all our washing up in the corridors so it is dried overnight if we are lucky.
Good quality diet suited to individual needs and preferences We monitor each dogs overall health and cater to their needs. Some dogs are on raw, others on sensitive or weight control or purely moist. Most are on kibble and moist mixed.
Their Occupation As an Occupational Therapist it always concerns me how we can keep our dogs involved, exploring and engaged in occupations throughout their day. We assess for toys on entry to ensure their safety and preference. Our dogs are happy in our kennels and alert and relating to people most of their day.
Comfort: Our dogs have lots of bedding of different textures including towelling, fleece, candlewick, polyester, brushed cotton, handknitted, vet bedding and ... but never fibre or feather filled duvets or pillows! Their beds are heaped up at night. Of a morning we remove the wet or dirty and leave them with a basic layers and then add in clean to make them cosy for snooze times. Some dogs like to drag their bedding into their runs during the day and lie and watch the world go by which is lovely to observe.
Cleanliness programme: With the best will in the world our kennelled dogs are spending 22 hours a day within their 24 hour days. This is allowing for a daily walk and their access to paddocks. The staff regimes attempts to accommodate the dogs that have retained their housetraining but needs must given the opportunity most dogs will display housetraining or recognise that their runs are the area they need to use for relief, keeping their sleep area clean. The kennel regime accommodates those who need immediate access to paddocks of a morning and we have a system with our volunteers where the volunteers respect those dogs that are accommodated by the staff first thing in the morning and last thing at night (Middle board) so Volunteers focus on the dogs within the kennel block early and last thin in the day's regime. The dogs who have staff interaction to offer relief get their walks in the middle of the day, so the dog's day is spread and they don't receive 2 exits from the kennel within an hour of each other then the rest of the time in their kennel.
Neighbourliness: Where the dogs are placed is very carefully discussed to meet needs especially with the long stay dogs and the new entry dogs. who we are still assessing or recovering from neuter or other vet interventions. What dogs are next-door can allow a dog to relax, or keep the dog social and add a sense of company.
IMG_7782.JPG
Grass paddocks are a big bonus. So many kennels have concrete exercise areas. We have large paddocks which are adjoined so dogs are exercised in pairs having interaction but safety at the same time which is excellent for their socialisation and improving their confidence with other dogs. Dogs love to just potter. Remember one critic stating '... and the dogs are left in paddocks without anyone there!' Yes!!!! they are safe and they can exhibit natural sniffing and exploring behaviours, the most natural activity we can provide. A session with volunteer or staff member with them is a completely different experience for them and both are invaluable.
IMG_7786.JPG
IMG_7787.JPG
These are our newest kennels and you can see we have used Avian grid so tiny squares so the dogs can again build up tolerance and exchange with their neighbours in safety and see everything that is going on in the block. The height of the side grids is absolute key. We have some that are low and others that higher. Only on a few do we have very high and obviously we use these for dogs that are very dog reactive, but importantly they have full vision at their doors and the grids are not at the height where the dog spends all day leaping up to try and see other dogs which we have witnessed in other kennels and exhausts the dogs and puts them at risk of Bloat. The noise levels are reduced greatly when dogs have sensory input and feel safe.
IMG_7788.JPG
This is the back kennels who enjoy easy secure access to a large paddock. They have low grids for natural interaction.

All kennels now have full grid entrance panels with large doors. The exposed kennels where exits faces open walks have a secure corridor with many gates for easy exit. These kennel, every dogs with the exception of one kennel can be taken from their kennel from their run area. so there isn't traffic in the kennel block itself except for staff which is safer and less perturbing for the dogs so they aren't going at the doors as they pass. The new jet wash is kept in the corridor area ( Old walker's room for ease of access as the kennels and drains are jet washed as staff time allows).
IMG_7780.JPG
Typical kennels showing the side grids with visibility panels for the dogs to observe and relate to each other and the double glazing windows to their bed area so they are warm at night but have natural light coming into the block whenever there is daylight. So you also see there is translucent roofing close to the bed area to enhance light penetration into the bed area and run. Then further forwards there is shade where the dogs love to stand and wait and watch the world go by but shielded from intense sunlight
IMG_7793.JPG
The Staff kitchen is central to the main block so the staff are around the dogs all day and easily able to intervene as needed and the dogs feel comforted by the company. We have 2 kennels visual on to the kitchen which we call care kennels and we nurse our dogs post neutering in these kennels are if they have special needs i.e. frightened of dogs they have a humanised experience of kennels.
Staggered doorways.JPG
Inside the dormitory main block we have at both ends staggered the doorways so the dogs aren't looking directly into the opposite dog's kennels. We also have widened the corridors. At each end of the kennel block we have large open mesh doors which allow air circulation through out the day with the heavy wooden doors closed of an evening or if the weather is bad.
Prison fencing.JPG
We have bought this grade of fencing for all our paddocks. It is brilliant as the dogs have full visibility of their surroundings and their neighbours can play but can not achieve any contact so dogs who have not been socialised learn to feel safe and begin normalised body language and exchanges. So often they play running games.
IMG_7781.JPG
IMG_7785.JPG
IMG_7783.JPG
Main kennel block showing how each kennel has 2 grids each side so when the dogs and staff are in the runs they have full vision right down the block and breezes dissipate.
Carport.JPG
This section of kennels were newly built by us. The kennels are roomy. Because there are trees nearby creating shade and shelter from winds the roof is fully translucent (Needs sweeping as leaves are a constant these days).
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xxlynne
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Re: Rescue Remedies Diary November 2021 - January 2022

Post by xxlynne »

Same world and different realism: Frozen
Christmas time is always very pertinent to me as it’s the story of the ‘no room in the Inn’. Our dogs are like TinyTim of Dickens’ Christmas Carol looking through windows into warm jovial family spaces with them outside abandoned with little hope. Our dogs are safe and we live with Eveready hope. Dogs out-with our reach, especially whose need we are ‘alive’ too are acutely forlorn. They are in homes where they aren’t wanted, or held by families whose circumstances have changed and that has made the dog’s security vanish. Some are with families who don’t care, demonised for their breed traits or just “being a dog traits” with needs. We always say if by law parents could give up their kids many would!
Laila waits forever
Laila waits forever
Human nature is on one level, where their needs are met, and many live towards self caring rewarding the self with excesses...holidays, meals out, tasting luxury. Some recognise there is space in their lives to nurture a dog to all’s enhancement. Many having lost a cherished dog see their ticket to freedom without the restraint of a dog, no matter how much they loved their last dog. They can make arrangements without considering a dependent. Even when acutely aware of the ‘lack and huge hole’ that pet’s life meant to them, they don’t think of the many that just need such an opportunity: If only they would. On the extreme we are at the coal face with the threat, the wall is cracked and threatening to fall down on us.
Now if you are reading this diary with fascination or curiosity you glimpse into our Rescue work. It will touch you but we shield you from the raw stress of the Rescue work, because in the core of the Rescue we are in acute pain. We are saving lives and working fast on the spinning wheel trying to secure hope for our dogs.
This first picture of Royce in the pound
This first picture of Royce in the pound

I recognise my reality of Rescue is a deep calling which is rare and I have always verged on the austere. I was a nun within Indian teachings no possessions for 5 years teaching meditation all over Britain; I went out in the freezing dead of night cutting wire fencing to a proposed nuclear site prepped for arrest, and then lying down in the road with other non-violent trained activists and arrested. I chose the avenues in Health Care that other professionals avoided like working with and for severe physically disabled people, enjoying the out and out characters in mental institutions that others wanted to make normal! I chose to work on dementia wards in the back waters of institutions making their and the staff’s lives easier. I took up a service where disabled people were seen as complainers and turned it around so our staff were listening to them and their carers and solving their unmet needs within a 3 month deadline; problems that had sat there for years. Once I stepped into Rescue I couldn’t see an empty room in my house without thinking of it as a lifesaving essential. Normal life swiftly dropped away. I know I am of a rare ilk and people who meet me know I have a whole lot of worries flying around in my head as I am cleaning, sorting or organising at the kennels. Fresh eyes don’t grasp the deep currents affecting the Rescue’s mission and hopefully they are able to play an invaluable role offering our dog’s company and joy. Their concerns may be putting a paddling pool in the paddock for play or sorting out the agility equipment in the paddock, teaching a dog ‘show tricks’. The concerns of Rescue are much more pressing and its about providing vital and lifesaving intervention. The ‘Too many dogs squad’ declare their failure to grasp the nub of Rescue: Each dog was desperate for our help and totally dependent on us saying yes and having put ourselves out time wise, space wise and financially to save them
Achilles waits waits waits
Achilles waits waits waits
In the heart of the Rescue there is a very fast pace, a sense of urgency to find our dogs homes and to get them out into homes providing it is the right home. We are the guardians of our dog’s needs as an adoption agency. Our dogs are totally dependent on us getting it right for them and we accept our quest is NOW! When homers tell us they are in no hurry or are waiting for 3 weeks as they have booked a meal out, we look into space and pass on by, as our dog’s needs are today. We have to get it right for our dogs as they can’t pick up the phone and say ‘Hi sorry but now I’m here its not working out for me’. So when people complain down the phone, as they do ‘We are offering a really good home but you are happy to leave that dog in a kennel’ they couldn’t be further from the truth, however a lovely home, there needs to be the safe guards our dogs need. We realise the gulf in understanding and the public and even some of our regular volunteers don’t need to ‘get it’. Our search is ardently on night and day to support the Rescue, it's dogs and try to find the right circumstance for our dogs to achieve a secure, successful and stable home for the first in their lives. We feel the rawness of somehow saving a dog’s life, where our resources are stretched to the limit, where we take risks committing to a dog on the wish and prayer we will have a kennel free in 4 days time when they arrive. Our focus is caring programmes for neglected dogs, identifying and meeting needs.
Hopefully our Rescue work has touched you as your beloved RR dog lies on the sofa beside, or you are gearing yourself for the icy conditions which you will meet on your next visit to the kennels, or knowing your standing order is enabling our work to carry on.
Rolo a little pup in an adults body
Rolo a little pup in an adults body
Well today having fretted all night I woke in alarm…we are planning for 3 foster dogs to be returned Baxter lunchtime, Kayla and Barney tomorrow, and a 11 year old Staffie Chaz to come back to us this morning first thing. .. that fills us up to the hilt. I’m frantic as a Chow is sitting in a pound who no one can/ will help and my voice is muted as we have no space. Usually I always have some manoeuvrability to squeeze an emergency in. I don’t. I already have our emergency (Chow) sitting there…and during the week I will receive so many calls at least one I will usually respond to calling that dog out of danger. Likewise Fran on enquiries is receiving so many desperate emails and passes them through hoping we can help an urgent, hoping we can save a life.
Mandy needs a special home for a special lovely lovely Bulldog
Mandy needs a special home for a special lovely lovely Bulldog
So here we are ‘frozen’ in every way and God bless Monica and Chris they have texted me to say they can keep Barney out for a further week, and I sigh that makes our Chow safe …but what of the urgents that will hit us hard in the week!
This wEEK becomes an EKKKK
Bond deserves better
Bond deserves better
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xxlynne
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Re: Rescue Remedies Diary November 2021 - January 2022

Post by xxlynne »

A perfect death:

Many of you have been there losing a parent, losing the last parent, losing your mother. This afternoon my mother passed. She had slowly wound down to being bedbound and not being able to move. Having had terrible transport problems, today with determination my local garage got the green van going and I sped down to see her with an intense sense of urgency. It had been over a week and far too long to have been away from her. The Paramedics had been called in yesterday morning are she had congested lungs and they decided her oxygen levels were low and we had a debate about admitting her into hospital. We stood firm with her wishes to die in her own home and they respected that but then my brother and I agreed to do alternate shifts with him spending the night and leaving as the carers arrived am. She had mumbled all night and he was up every 2 hours. When I arrived this lunchtime she was still mumbling a lot "Oh dear" Oh dear" I was able to cuddle her and hold her like a baby in my arms and we joked when I said she was a bag of bones. In fact I managed to get her to do a broad grin about 3 times and my heart flowed and I told her what a fantastic mother and person she has been. The tables had turned full circle and it was as if I was holding a baby who was goo gooing whilst I positioned the straw as if it was a nipple and got her to suckle a vitamin drink. The carers arrived and we had an half hour chatting over her care and how pleased they were she had drunk 1 and 1/2 vitamin drinks and a small ice cream. They wanted to care for her and would have been bereft had she gone into hospital leavng them as her friends. When they left I chatted and noticed she had gone into a relaxed sleep. On reflection she may have died. Looking at her and knowing how agitated she had been all night I texted my brother to say I'm going to leave her as I didn't want to disturb such a beautiful sleep moving around. When my brother got there 90 mins later she had passed and was still warm but we now think she passed with me. I was fortunate to have been with my father when he passed as the staff allowed me to stay in the hospice overnight with him.
September 21 My favourite picture of Joycee
September 21 My favourite picture of Joycee
A perfect death and a wonderous death for which I am eternally grateful to fate and fortune.

New Chapter as I try to bring my life back into a more achievable dimension again, and try to free myself of chronic tension that has crept into my body, living life so intensely. This is the Rescue diary, but the Rescue has its influences and we are all people and there are major issues which affect our calling and ability to devote, or indeed enhance the love factor played out in our mission. Many of us are meeting real life challenges and quests whilst we volunteer and continue our dedication. Thank you to this diary for giving me the opportunity to share such a beautiful phase of my life as my mother became my closest friend and my dependent and the joy this bought to my own life story.
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