Rescue Remedies Diary August 2020 - October 2020

A behind the scenes look at our work
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Rescue Remedies
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Rescue Remedies Diary August 2020 - October 2020

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A Heatwave has been with us and as I sit this afternoon to catch up with diary I feel blessed to be out of the oven. Our dogs are mainly tucked themselves away in their bed areas having their siesta. We have reorganised our work and walks this week to avoid the afternoon heat.

Security: Eddie and Darrel started a much needed shaded job on Thursday to secure the perimeter gates. The front gate of the site is now finished less a few adjustments. They are now putting a large and small gate at the entrance of the woods. This means if any dog gets loose there will the usual cry for closure and all three gates can be closed and apart from running through the flood trenches, which are not obvious through scrub, they will be mainly contained on the property. We have had a few escapes over the last 3 years. The most notable ones were Bailey who got out of a paddock and went for a run around and then came home! Maisie one of our lurchers who got free up the lane and ran all the way to her kennel door. Hooch who had a run around into the big paddock. Then there was Nigel the Shar pei who was missing for a VERY LONG 24 hours. I ended up climbing under a huge lorry where he had taken shelter and pulling him free. Marge, Kirby and Bella also got loose. The most recent drama was my personal dogs getting through a back gate which had failed to secure 9pm. Marcus and Tootsie were found still on site but Max my 14 year old terrier was nowhere to be found. Never under estimate a terrier. Whenever I have done dog searches and I have done many I always conclude don't follow me as I'm always proved to be the opposite direction to where the dog is actually found. Max's escape was no different. Ella & I searched the site and she called Anna & Paige as reinforcements whilst I went out towards the road and into nearby estates. The girls stayed on site and the other direction; had stopped to talk to a man on a large lorry going into the sewage works asking them to look out for Max. The main pump had broken just into lockdown and so every night large tankers were coming and going into the site. The main gates were open and flood lite. 1am and we are just saying goodnight with me saying I'll be up first light, when a man in orange uniform appeared to say I've found your dog but I'm not going in to get it. He took us to the back of the sewage works and Paige waded out into sewage slurry to lift little Max out...it was pitch black. He had just glimpsed him with a search torch stuck out away from the bank. I felt such a relief, saved from the worst nightmare ever.
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Max hasn't suffered any damage but did have to endure 5 baths within the next 24 hours with a tight groom to relieve him of his new aftershave. So you can see what a relief it is to finally get the gates done on the property, but of course the first one we did was the back gate which had failed.

Our Planet: When I took a sabbatical from work my first thought was to do environmental projects and part of that was to cultivate our large garden and as with every property I have bought to change the tarmac on the front to a garden for all to enjoy.
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Having always been unconventional many people stopped to look at a garden that was bursting with wildlife and flowers and encroaching the pavement. My sabbatical was changed when my darling Fern lost the use of her back and back legs and so my journey began entering dog rescuing. HOWEVER the care and respect of the planet has always informed my decisions from a very young age..instinctively I never wanted children for that reason. I have always lived very frugally and try to make a minimum impact of the planet by reusing; buying caste offs and living on reduced food from the supermarkets. Having been vegetarian for 49 years this has helped the planet too, but of course my dogs have my 'deemed' share of slaughtered protein. I tend to internalise my sincere caring for the planet. Twice this week I have got upset by seeing waste and the persons I have been with would never have understood where my internal stance came from. When you purchase you commission and take on a responsibility for those materials from creation to decay. This is an instinctive stance to an environmentalist (..emphasis on mentalist!) Most people will never have any regard for discard. Today Clair and I were working on the land and for the 3rd time worked on a former rubbish dump just by the front gate. Someone in the past buried plastic from the kennels. Steph who has worked here the longest doesn't remember this being done so its over 20 years. We are digging out plastic still in tact and readable as if it was buried last week. We both felt it a violation of our earth but then whilst its affrontative to see it on "your land" we send it off to landfill, some massive pile out in the countryside, which is as much a violation only out of sight and out of our minds. In India there just isn't a rubbish collection and over the past 15 years the plastic just doesn't rot away. They will with their litter and are an ever visible intrusion, be it buried in pits, like the kennels, did not so long ago. BETTER NOT to buy (Commission).

Anyone who sets up a project be it a software company; a dog rescue or garden furniture manufacturer will have the ethics of the founder at their roots. I would say that a company has lost its soul, if that founder walks away, sells it as a corporate or succumbs to a lesser values and standards to accommodate and perhaps blend with the common focus. I have always kept the reigns tight on the Rescue as it is synonymous with me and my values as hard as they are to explain sometimes. Anyone who doesn't like the ethics or direction can always go and set up their own show...I did it ..there is lots of space in the market place, hundred and hundreds of dog who need urgent help. Today I've explained a little of where I come from and my value for each animal's life as valuable as my own. Having an Indian other half, it was suggested I was Jain in my last birth! Also I have such a love for nature. I have never been interested in making business type decisions for economic reasons. The integrity of our value system attracts many people in to caring for our dogs. No interest in moving the Rescue away from the truest of roots of being there for dogs who have NOWHERE else to go. Their survival is totally dependent on us. My pitch has been on finding trustworthy homes then you can help the next. In the early days of the rescue when my house was full and I was a thin as a stick 'cause I was walking the dogs in rotation all day long...I would never have thought to use kennels. Each dog taught me so much. It was a very stressful time. I remember when a new intake only had my bathroom to go in (I never used crates) I felt terrible desperate to find a dog a home to get this dog out the bathroom as I felt I had gone as low as I was prepared to go. The family always came forwards. When a dog arrived on my doorstep it came in, it unpacked it's suitcase and we spent a few interesting days whilst we got to know each other within the pack or as visitor in one of my rooms. This reminds me of Evans who came from a puppyfarm in Wales. He was a Staffie who had never been in a home.
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I always had a separated dog in my small kitchen and that was usually a Staffie. Evan arrived and Evans had a different view of being separated. He was kept behind a tall dog gate and was friendly enough to all the dogs going out the front door for their walks. One morning I came down to find he had used his jaw to bend 2 rails. Then this progressed so one rail fell out. Then 2 and his snort was out and he had his Staffie smile on view. Soon his head was through and within days he was mixing with all the dogs in the lounge with the happiest grin on display.

So a few ramblings whilst the lawns bake dry and try to retain what green they have. Wonderful week for homings

Dogs Weekly shows it all Lowest number of dogs we have had in 12 years! Happy days
Dog's Weekly updated daily

Most wont remember Fruitcake I have always remembered him because I collected him as emergency from a vet surgery where they were determined to put him to sleep as he had growls twice. I collected him that morning and they werent happy for me to take him and were shocked when I put him in the front seat with me to travelled 2 hours to Farnham kennels. They did put their nerves in me. He was very closed down and frightened and gradually talking to him on the long journey out of London he began to soften. I was dreaming up a name for him and his head was like a Christmas pudding so I called him Fruitcake (Now called Dexter). Found this video of him and my heart danced

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xxlynne
Posts: 9003
Joined: Sun Jun 01, 2014 8:01 am

Re: Rescue Remedies Diary August 2020 - October 2020

Post by xxlynne »

Yes times are changing. Big changes we have witnessed this year:

Muddy January: Squelch need I say more.

Floods & Kennel closure February: Closure of the last outlyer kennels Guildford mid February with accommodation of all dogs on site, and us coming together finally all on one site.

Covid 19 March: From early March as local hospitals were going red alert and we saw Covid heading our way. We have all been through a massive 'Stop! brakes slammed on ...and now proceed in the new normal. Each one of us has to be the re-enforcers to remind everyone we are still in the depth of a pandemic. Fortunately we have all adjusted to live with it: Witness yourself instinctively walking backwards after the start of a conversation with someone. Witness washing your hand far more regularly. Witness you adorning your mask as you exit your car and smiling with your eyes as people glance your way.

Flood of Homing Questionnaires April onwards. Throughout this period we have had an explosion of Homing Questionnaires. This has had a major impact on volunteers dealing with enquiries; facebook; telephone calls; google reviews. At times I have witnessed the stress levels so high but such is the amazing commitment of our dedicated admin. volunteers support us with no praise or recognition they carry on. They have managed it and solves some hiccups and given off a calm exterior to the public. These front of house volunteers need our salute for communicating clearly to people who often don't understand the real dynamics, for educating people as to the practical nature of preparing for a dog and recognising the demand levels facing us all. Yes it felt like the whole world was shouting at us rather than clapping us!

Its August and reflecting on where we are. We have just come out from a heatwave like never before. Yes Climate change is here; and lifestyle change is here.
Zippy de doo car
Zippy de doo car
Walkers needed: We have a backlog of Volunteers wanting to start walking. So we move forwards into our new normal practice and ask our experienced volunteers who have returned to lend a hand and be tutored in inducting new walkers. So many people have more time on their hands and also have taken stock of their lives and are grasping what is really important. Helping homeless dogs ...way up there! So lets get in a new generation of walkers. Volunteers that stepped back for lockdown please step forwards for our dogs.

Kennel numbers: We have the lowest number of dogs since 2009/ 2010. We get a lot of volunteers 'suggesting' we have too many dogs in. We laugh then we turn it on its head ?like they want there not to be so many homeless dogs. ?They want us not to help so many. ?They want there to be fewer pleading eyes asking to be walked. Like they carry the actual stress of so many dogs, as well as those dogs knocking on our door. The fact is although we have full kennels, we have the lowest number in total.
Bonnie
Bonnie
Fostering: Another regular question is why don't we put more dogs into foster. We have answered this question time and time again but still the question will resurface as a simple solution to all our problems. Here are 10 reasons why given our resources and situation we don't take up many foster offers.
1:Logistics: Vetting foster families is equal to, if not more than, vetting for family for a permanent home. FACT: We have hundreds of families waiting offering permanent homes. Most foster offers are not to accommodate more difficult to home dogs, but expect to foster the most easiest to home dogs.
2:Hand Holding: To really support fosterers, there has to be someone on hand to talk through all their observations and needs just as we do post homings. This has to be a member of our Homing Team who can reflect back the realities and steer a steady course with the emotions as the family adjusts to the moving picture of a dog settling in.
3:The emotional roller coaster of Fostering: Fact of life with fosterers first few days they are in total love, the dog can do no wrong, they are bubbling over with joy and love and we want to keep him. 2 weeks later. He has done this, we are struggling with this, we are not sure if we can keep him past such a such a date, we will try. We are finding this behaviour difficult. 4 weeks later: "Hi hello just checking in, have you had any more enquiries for him. Its just that we are getting so attached and we didn't expect to have him so long. It is difficult on us all, we really don't want to return him to kennels but we have never wanted 2 dogs and my husband is really not happy. Can you call me with any new homes someone on facebook said they had enquired could you let me know if you got that one." Yes sure we only need to apply our minds and the home is ready made there for the asking.
4:Health needs: There is always minuet observations with the inexperienced eye, causing concerns which can end up in trips to the vets. Once a dog is no longer visible to myself, you have to air on the side of caution. Using other than our vets, can cost us a lot. Many modern vets now are trained by the big chains to investigate at great costs, and only then treat. They are often not geared to recognising a homeless dog transitional state post kennelling and validate issues that would naturally settle now given a kennel free life. We say honey they say injection and antibiotics. We say rest and avoid; they say Xray. We pay those vet bills and it takes a hard toll on us. Within the kennels this or that is bought to my attention. I will say not concerned, keep an eye, try this for 3 days. I have worked alongside my current vet for 14 years and he trusts my thinking but further more I have a pretty good idea how he thinks. I have his personal number so I send a picture or a question to him anytime, but only when I myself am concerned. Its different if I don't have direct contact.
5:Emotional overlay: Fosterers are offering a wonderful opportunity but it naturally also comes with a lot of nerves. I felt it in my gut every time I took in my next foster dog. Seasoned fosterers play down and 'place' issues in the round. New fosterers often play up and seek support advice through their facebook contacts; forum and any which way which can tie the whole affair into a tight knot of varied advice which the Rescue in the end needs to unravel.
6:Prepared for return: Rarely is the commitment 'until a home is found'. We can be given a loose or a definite return date, which we in amongst of everything else must honour. So we can have a kennel empty for 3 days because so and so are coming back. It can place me in confusion as to how I can accommodate the return from foster, when I'm faced with a sudden breakdown in homing or emergency from a council pound.
7:Emergent emergencies: Suddenly there is a change of circumstance and the foster dog is the one losing its place.. .mother isn't well; after school activities meaning this or that. Up until now we have been able to manage this, but because of this I'm afraid it just isn't possible to do this. The dog walker; the afternoon support; the change in job; the change in shifts; the social worker; the youngest son; the visiting step son's mother! Going away for the weekend resident dogs welcome, foster dog is one too many, need to bring back on Friday. Foster dogs have a calling on our time, kennel space etc
8:Labelling: Any labelling of a homeless dog is through the lens of their assessor. The assessment has to be placed within the set of circumstances which affects the dog. Believe me the more experienced you are in assessing dogs the looser you are in applying any form of label. Dogs are fluid and far more adaptable a species than ever we are. People put a human brain on a dog and over think things, and do them a disservice. Dogs dont carry human reasoning Thank God! They are a far less complicated a species Thank God! An inexperienced foster with all their sincerity can define a dog through their lens, summed up in 2 days and then argue with us when we dare to disagree or open it up a little. We can have a problem presenting the foster with a good family who we think is perfect, as they can scrutinise what they feel a dog must have. For example they don't live in a flat so their foster dog must have a garden. They don't go to work so their foster dog won't cope with being left for 3x 5 hours spells through the week. When you work in the Homing Team and those that can stick at it,you gain a Masters degree in philosophy; psychology; counselling and the human condition++.
9:Choice of dog: The Rescue carries around 70 dogs on our brain at any one time. We know the dogs who are most in need of a foster place. We also are very experienced in reading home or/ and foster offers. With foster offers we do ask the foster to be open to our choosing a dog to suit the families needs, and the dog that most deserves the opportunity. We remind them they are not homing a dog, they are offering a place for the most needy homeless dog that we feel they could manage. " We didn't want so old: We only wanted..." There comes a difficulty when the foster families offer is focused, take it or leave it attitude. A detailed dialogue develops as to why they can't take this or that dog. On that basis we will tend to leave it. We exist for our dogs.
10: Logistics of organising a homing from a foster home: We have clear policies and procedures. We spend time communicating to a foster family so they understand the reasoning why we do this in this order. One thing very striking about managing volunteers they are not employees. They may not sign up to a companies ethos; policies and procedures. They can want to do their own thing, and think they have a far better way to introduce a foster dog to a potential owner. They bring a dog on to their social platform and they are leading the show. Some fosterers do not want to play this role at all. A family is ready to come and the timing doesn't suit, so the homing is delayed, sometimes 10 days to get both families together.

In theory it is great to get all our dogs out of kennels into foster but the realities are very different. Our resources in our Rescue in 2020 is focused as it is. I have run a Rescue where we never used kennels, and indeed when a dog came in there was nowhere else for it to go I made it work. Our model of Rescue is how it is, as it has emerged and works fine for our dogs and optimises volunteer skill and time. Kennels aren't such a bad deal for our dogs. They are loved, cared for and apart from when we are busy with walkers the kennels are quiet and the dogs have a lot of downtime. The kennel dogs can capitalise on homings by being there when a family are in discussion and the dog they came to meet isn't quite right for them. There can be a snobbery against kennel life but in truth our dogs see this as a safe place of many friends. They have lovely walks with walkers and paddock time with the staff.
Henry
Henry
A good fosterer and foster home can really make all the different to one of our dogs. We have and had many brilliant fosterers. I just wanted to share the complexities of managing a fosterer's portfolio and why it is very time intensive if done properly and how we have to gauge whether we can lend our time limitations towards this area as a Rescue at this point in time. We however do have finite time and our priority will always be to recognise there are more families waiting to receive a dog permanently in their lives, and that is the focus we have. We are very lucky to have so many lovely families waiting.

Well as usual I start to cover one subject in the Diary and end up rambling on into another. Such is life

Dogs Weekly
xxlynne
Posts: 9003
Joined: Sun Jun 01, 2014 8:01 am

Re: Rescue Remedies Diary August 2020 - October 2020

Post by xxlynne »

Sidney comes this week
Sidney comes this week
Busy and quite dramatic week Lots happening but not much showing
Belle still waits
Belle still waits
We had 3 really good homes line up for 3 of our dogs this week they all withdrew giving one reason or another within days of homing.
We took a Malamute in, for the owners to appear the next day with red eyes where they hadn't slept and saying they could not part with their boy.
Homing Team have been so busy but little to show for it this week other than we are zooming through our back log and fine tuning our process to beginning to be back on track

RSPCA Truth is we are shocked this week ref.
"The RSPCA will close three of its animal centres and reduce senior and middle management by 20% as part of its ongoing restructure. Following a review of its activities, the charity said today that it will close one of its two London animal hospitals, Putney Hospital, as well as a linked cattery and clinic in Southall. In the South of England, it will close an equine centre in Godalming and an animal centre in South Godstone." It breaks my heart as these are key sites serving the poor in South London and ofcourse serving thousand of animals. Difficult to judge but would have thought these services would have been key to the image and ethos of what the RSPCA should be providing.
Marvellous Marvin
Marvellous Marvin
Our Tree Fund: We have had 2 tree surgeons come around the site as we have lost quite a few trees this year on site and in surrounding woods. Both focused on a twin elderly Ash whose beauty we recently discovered exposed with a our new pathway. The other ofcourse was our Willow close to the kennels and close to everyone's hearts. Our Willow lost one of its 3 main limbs suddenly which we were so shock over as Evie was sitting below it at the time with Jack!
This Friday we had all witnessed the winds and made it clear walkers were not to walk in the woods. At 11.45am One of the twin Ashes crashed down towards the river and landed beside the bridge, covering the bridge and missing the cars parked there ..well denting Steph's roof. Eddie was just getting into his car and was so lucky 4 mins later he would have got some force on the bridge. Early afternoon and another almighty crack and the 2nd of the 3 limbs of the Willow went. Luckily no one was hurt but left the Willow unbalanced. We have had it assessed and decided its a major risk factor as it will fall on the kennels so our beloved Willow is being taken down in the next 2 days.
Many want to contribute to this focused project. This will support site safety for all and build a legacy for the future enjoyment. We need work done on tree clearance; management and NEW PLANTING. I will be asking firstly if anyone has any tree saplings they could donate. Looking specifically for trees who (yes they are persons) do well on heavy clay soil Oak: Ask: Hazel: Birch; Willow & Holly do well. Would like to introduce White Beam: Lime; Aspen. Sadly Beech wouldn't do well and please not Sycamore as they spread like crazy and Elm are still disease risk.
If you want to and can, please donate but please also complete Giftaid please submit if you haven't for the last 4 years if you are a tax payer so we can enhance your contribution
• Payee Bank Name is HSBC Surbiton Branch
• Payee Account Name Rescue Remedies
• Payee Sort Code 404325
• Payee Account Number 11371665
We will keep you updated on the Fund and its achievement.
Obvious we don't want this to conflict or detract from our core need as a Rescue, that is providing for our current and future dog shelter and care needs via kennelling costs and vet costs. We always need money as we are supporting many longstay dogs. However, especially the volunteers who know and love the site, they are welcome to help us to provide this much needed work.
We are also advertising for volunteers to come and spend Monday or/ and Thursday on site specifically to work on the lands clearing and planting. This activity already occurs 10.30 - 4.30 obviously social distancing is a major feature and sensible clothes as we work in all weathers.
(Usain) Bolt
(Usain) Bolt
xxlynne
Posts: 9003
Joined: Sun Jun 01, 2014 8:01 am

Re: Rescue Remedies Diary August 2020 - October 2020

Post by xxlynne »

Very good week on Homings: Tilly & Maggie 2 kits found stray caught up under brambles! Rojo The Caverlier; Lilly an elderly Staffie who has been living outside; Rosie the Athlete/ Springer/ Staffie/JRT; Arby the Goon large puppy Cane Corsa; Betty devotional Staffie; Maxx the GSD puppy; & Fudge elderly JRTx

We have a detailed and very well rehearsed Homing Meet procedure which is dog centred and is there to benefit potential families to be served best in their bonding and handling skills in preparation for their future journey.

Facilitation: As with the ethos of our Rescue all our processes are there to provide a platform for our dogs and we always consciously keep our emotions in check as they should never be on display attracting our dog's attention to us, but rather always facilitating the dog to engage with their visitors. One volunteer is involved, unless the other is training how to carryout homings.

Introductions: There are variations, some of them I will explain, but the ethos is clear. Generally we welcome the family group in the car park and invite them to use the toilet and wash their hands on arrival. The Homing Lead will discuss if there are things of note in meeting each dog then goes to get the dog which is top of their list. We have always selected a reserve which equally meets the homer's criteria but the prominent dog first.

Introducton to our Dog:The dog is then led out to meet the family and the Homing Lead continues to hold the lead as you set off on the first walk. They have a new lead ready for the lead exchange. The family are invited to make comments, ask questions and above all keenly watch the dog's behaviour around themselves especially if children are involved, passing dogs, cars, people and reactions to noises etc. The Homing Lead will draw their attention to any behaviours they want to emphasis like slight flinching on touch, management and dog language around passing and approaching dogs. This is what the homing meet is all about, the family engaging and getting to understand the dog they are interested in. This walk can be to the top of the road and back or around the common being a 40 minute circuit. The new lead is engaged and passed over to the family once the Homing Lead and the family feel comfortable to take the lead. We instruct the family member to put the lead around the wrist, not to hold in their hand. I am remembering Murphy's homing 5 weeks ago where he was ragging the lead and ragging the lead and in fact he never stopped ..why didn't we video that! I was still trying to move his attention on to the walk as we were arriving back at the kennels with me still holding his lead. BUT yes his family saw him at his worst and fell in love with his ver ver vum! He has entertained them ever since. We aim to show the dog so hope that behaviours that need careful management are demonstrated. During the walk we ask if another member of the family wishes to take over the lead who are deemed responsible to manage the dog.
Sometimes it is important a family appreciate how the dog is within the kennel area and how they are managed. On these occasions I will ask one of the family to accompany me into the kennels and either observe me going into the dog's kennel and harnessing them or sometimes the family member will come in with me and inter relate. This is specifically where the family needs to understand energy levels and management. Also they get a sense of what an ordeal kennels has on each dog. These insights often are fed-back to other family members by the family member, and can give the family further insights.

Display of dog skills: On return to kennels we are either getting the second dog / reserve out and doing the same 'getting to know you' walk if equal chance of homing. Or where it is very clear cut we are now going to introduce the resident dog on a parallel walk with the Homing Lead initiating the introductions and hopefully soon passing over the lead to one of the adults once the dogs are settling. We manage this as we are very used to introducing dogs and we want the first encounter to go smoothly and the family to note how we did the slow 'coming together'. If there is not a resident dog, this is where we go and get the next 'runner up' dog out and begin parallel walking with the family retaining control of the now met, settled dog. If there is a clear front runner i.e. Shepherd people meeting well matched Shepherd i.e. unlikely they will swerve their emotions on the second dog then we are choosing a dog that will support the walk. A stooge dog is one that might 'ruffle feathers' but likely to settle within the next 6-10 minutes. We ask the family to be open, the 2nd dog is always chosen by us as it too meets the families needs so if they do transfer their emotions on the the 2nd dog we are not turning around and saying sorry for this and this reason we wouldn't home this dog with yourselves.

Paddock meeting: The 3rd phase of the meeting is to take the chosen dog to the paddock and to enjoy off lead engagement. The Homing lead may stand outside the paddock (Covid) observing the interaction or go in initially if there are 2 dogs involved but obviously social distancing still being practised.

Variations:
Where we want the family to witness a dog in a high dog density setting we have the habit of jumping in 2 cars and taking the selected dogs over to a local park Earlswood's Lake so the family can witness a natural management of a dog around pushchairs; passing dogs, off lead dogs etc. On hotter days we would walk both chosen dogs together there so as not to leave a dog in a hot car.
Where the dog has people issues we may do phase 1. observing the dog, then 3. people skills then finish with 2. dogs skills.

Homing picture taken and discussion on safe transportation... and message immediately texted to myself and the Homing Team member!

In Rescue Remedies we have always tried to make the homing meet the time for the dog to transfer their energy to the family, with the family gaining insights enough to manage their new dog during the transportation home and for them to feel confident when the walk out into their first Park walk. This is the FAMILY'S meeting. We are never intrusive and the homing is respected, with the strong message that all communication hence forth continues with the Homing Team member. General feedback of their dog's journey into their new life is via the Forum. The Forum is where their dog's thread is and it has been built up and can continue throughout their life ending in Rainbow Bridge..whole life from introduction to Rescue captured! Facebook is just a hello out of the blue then disappears into the blue.

We never arrange to visit our dogs post homing. This is intrusive and is usually all about the volunteers emotions treading over the dog settlement process. In my view it is bewildering to the dog, to take their mind back into their past and can upset some of the settlement gained as the dog is left with confusions. To me its like a past boyfriend / girlfriend popping by to say hello! The Forum plays the role of engagement with the dog happily engaged wholly with their family gradually, gradually trusting, this is my home, this is my family. Likewise it would be inappropriate in my view for volunteers to keep contact other than the Homing Team member, it just isn't a professional service. In the past this has led to massive misunderstandings when family's state what the fosterer or volunteer has been advising which the Homing Team were not aware of and either an issue doesn't get to the Homing Team representative in its kernel stage or the homing has to be completely unpacked due to contradictory advice. For this reason we do not encourage homers to use the Forum to air their concerns as there are a lot of armchair advisers who don't know this particular dog, nor the families personal issues or circumstances.

The Homing Meet is a sacred affair: It is a ritual, in the sense of "a right of passage" of our dog moving their emotions through into their family and if we are successful there isn't a second glance as they jump in the car. Smiles and blessings are exchanged but never cuddles and tears from the Homing Lead; we keep our emotions in check and provide therefore a platform unimpeded for the family to recognise their new family member and literally take up the reigns for the future. We have played our part. We have passed over our knowledge and 'tips'. The family aren't observers and pushed aside with a display of emotion, and feeling outsiders, being impressed by how much the Homing Lead loved them! How much the dog loved the Homing Lead! No, the family have left the situation with the Homing Lead witnessing a deep bond developing and inwards they are saying "yes you will love this family far more than ever you loved all us. They will awaken your heart deeply and you theirs". Gradually within the homing process the family and their new dog are believing they were destined for one another.

As a Rescue we have served our function and we move on to help the next, and the next...
Our Hornet's nest
Our Hornet's nest
Our hornet's nest has grown large. It is full of busy Europeon strain of hornets. It shapes our lives accessing the back kennels and as soon as the lights go on around the house they are attracted to them so if I have left windows open I have a hornets invasion and I find myself with parts of the house closed off with a very careful door opening the next morning!
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Hollyhocks in first year bloom
Hollyhocks in first year bloom
My love of Hollyhocks not bad for first year display. Next year my garden can get underway.

Click here: Dog's Weekly 63 dogs (not counting 2nd dog in pairs)

Well done everyone we are a force for good!
xxlynne
Posts: 9003
Joined: Sun Jun 01, 2014 8:01 am

Re: Rescue Remedies Diary August 2020 - October 2020

Post by xxlynne »

Time passes and time flies. Currently we are pressing ever onwards with the kennel upgrade employing 2 fulltime people from the kennel business to achieve much improved kennels for our dogs and facilities for them to enjoy time outside their kennels. The storm 5 weeks ago took our Willow tree with it, and so we are aiming to prepare the land by raising it over a foot with trenching to avoid the flooded plain that it was over the past few years. That is on hold, as we determinedly focus on making the drainage and new kennel runs where the bedding drying area was. We also need to finish the roofing on the carport kennels.
In the lands we need to fell the twin ash which we know is ready to fall this year and follow its sister recent demise. We have more daffodils to plant and more brambles and stinging nettles to lift. We are always relieving our trees of strangling ivy. Haven't had any volunteers come forwards to work on the woodland projects, which being a gardener by nature I have found a surprize but we press on.
Cola & Ted
Cola & Ted
Our Rescue
Our therapeutic environment & ethos is supported by positivism: The powerful, creative force for good - investing in others to overcome life's hurdles. That is why our volunteers come to us and support the work we all do. With this comes blunt force determination for our dogs to succeed. Yes celebrating our dogs' achievements, and building of understanding between us, all those who help them. Our dogs are our teachers and we all line up behind them recognising their needs and gifts and applauding as they achieve self worth. We acknowledge all those enablers, who support positive outcomes and growth. The therapist has to comprehend the complexity of influencers, their own part as guide, with helicopter vision and acknowledgement of successes, underlining those with the achiever. To adapt and adjust in the context of the whole, to ground into skills and insight. When there is a plateau in attainment this is a very important phase when the skills are bedded down into the muscle memory, infusing and informing future proofing successes. The vision and demeanour of therapeutic intervention is focused away from self. It is actively focusing in the individual in front, intently comprehending the multitude of influencing factors affecting and hindering their wellbeing. Enabling and offering opportunities in self discovery and supporting self believe. I left my job in Tottenham court road to join the therapeutic world with my college place secured. I needed to expose myself to raw needs and so worked in an elderly care home for 9 months with people with physical frailties, dementia, witnessing the impact on the individual and their families. Also the social deprivation which comes with uprooting an individual into an institution, which naturally gears itself to functional practicalities of care. Care of the dying had a profound impact on my makeup and opened me up a deep spiritual essence which informed my integrity and heightened my spiritual view on 'life'.
Orla & Henry
Orla & Henry
The main thing I bring to the table in the Rescue in leading and shaping the Rescue is lateral thinking and stoic faith in our dogs and volunteers. I don't jump to immediate conclusions, I mull things over and try to perceive in context certain aspects. I infuse to evaluate...then enthuse and bounce off ideas to overcome a problem or to solve a need.
The opposite to a therapeutic ethos is negatism: When people have a damaged, frail self-confidence they consciously /unconsciously seek to self-promote, to impress and gain recognition for their contribution. It is singular in nature and is ego bound . The mind-set revolves around their inner hunger to gratify their own self-worth. Their lens is on their own needs. Reflection is 'I'm compassionate; I'm caring; I'm must make an impact and draw attention to my contribution. The mind doesn't relax and learn to accept others views or key players leadership but, opposes, challenges and undermines. Negativity attempts to splinter; it doesn’t harmonise with all contributions. It looks for acclaim. Better than spiralling around and down, is to open to others value, worth or invaluable impact and to share the joy. Negatism is striving to gain self-worth and there is a subtle competition. My knowledge is more astute than yours; my understanding is more intense than yours. I see people who suffer from this in varying levels, and am very willing to give the platform and attention according to need. What must ultimately come through is everyone’s contribution is equally appreciated and given worth and as a team, recognition, respect and acknowledgement of everyone's invaluable role in support of the outcomes.
One of the spiritual paths I studied in my 20s was curative eurythmy, which informed me how the soul embodies the essence of language/ expression, sounds, words through movement. You study each letter in depth in its impact on meaning and conveyance of mood and truth. D is deep, depression, dark, dry, dagger, dread, drag and ultimately death. D sums up negatism to me. It is fear based and has an unstable foundation to set your life on, as subtly negatism is destructive and acts to demolish.
Lily & Mika
Lily & Mika
So within organisations you can tussle to maintain a positive front, taking everyone together forwards. Negative elements are ignored, isolated and left out of the whole. People are attracted into positive teams and their contribution is harmonised within the whole. Blended and melded outcomes so people cheer one another and lift and smile at the success
To me negativity is like weeds you try not to plant them; to lift as early as you can to avoid damaging the flowers. We are blessed with having a Rescue where people are afforded respect and a welcoming atmosphere is there in which all can thrive.
Owen & Wilson
Owen & Wilson
Dogs Weekly 54 kennels 9 in foster lowest dog levels for 12 years We're carrying 25 dogs less than in January 20
xxlynne
Posts: 9003
Joined: Sun Jun 01, 2014 8:01 am

Re: Rescue Remedies Diary August 2020 - October 2020

Post by xxlynne »

TimmyTim our longest ever dog who is in permanent foster
TimmyTim our longest ever dog who is in permanent foster
Early October already. Autumn is upon us and the winter is beginning to close in. Living in the kennels you are starkly aware of the weather and its impact on the activities for our dogs. We carry about 55 dogs on site and about 10 in foster.
Honey Honey
Honey Honey
It is very hard to appreciate what the general public assume about our Rescue. Due to the high quality of our Websites; Photographs; Enquiries; Professional set up on our Forum and Facebook pages. Truth is a core of volunteers have devoted themselves as a foundation to the Rescue for over 10 years. They have weathered the storms that flow with any organisation.
Alison: 2009 Alison known affectionately as Secret Squirrel has set up, upgraded, adapted and spearheaded our internet platforms and is regularly faced with urgent calls to sort blips. Alison also fostered and adopted one of our dogs Tia who was desperately ill and needed help. Alison is due to have her 2nd knee replacement this week and we are all praying for her and hoping nothing goes wrong with the websites etc over the next month!!
Fran: Fran started off with Polly in the very early days 2005? They supported by fostering and supported other fosterers and homings and then walked at Farnham..in fact Fran set up Farnham with Karen. Fran now plays invaluable roles within the Rescue and is that prop that supports all, making it happen smoothly. She majors currently in chief lead in the Forum; dealing with all enquiries and sorting through dogs in their own homes that need urgent clarification of circumstance to be able to judge urgency of our engagement. Fran also does all the microchipping changes and ordering and liaison with companies and families. Fran has done many fosterings in the past and also led through on many homings. Fran is that person who is a personal support for me in times of real need, we have a lot of water under the bridge.
Charlie: July 07 enter Charlie and Bill who stepped forwards to adopt Ted. In 2009 we started to use Gatwick Kenns and I was the sole walker with Elaine the dog warden in Crawley, then Charlie volunteered as she worked near and her mother lived close. She then moved house into the area and the rest is history as she led on building up the walker based in Gatwick with Ali; Godstone South; Godstone North and Freer. Now is the guiding force for the walkers in the Rescue steering inductions, daily walks and risk assessments, supported by significant others.
Ali1234: 2008 Ali volunteered many moons ago when we used kennels near Croydon and helped up develop good walker standards and supported new walkers including Charlie, Anne and Barry. Ali set up the Walkers planning and Walker dogs sheets. She also fostered for us then, homed one of our needy lurchers Dave and she is fostering for us now.
Teresa: Back in 2008 adopted a dog which her resident dog didn't take to and sadly bought back. She then resurfaced to walk at the Godstone South kennels when we took them on. Teresa has supported the Rescue through walking and Facebook ever since. Facebookians are such a hardy lot, most of us couldn't cope with the battle of trolls and emotional rollercoasting that is Facebook. However our Facebook pages serve our dogs well. Teresa is invaluable in her dedication and when she lost dear Ellie she stepped forwards and said ?which Staffie needs us most! HeidiHO!!
Dianna: Dianna started as a fosterer in Oct 09 and homed Benji and came forwards to help on the homing team then homed Micky. Dianna has singlehanded led the Homing team for 11 years. Dianna also deals with all the dogs in their own homes many of them being given rock solid advice and appreciating they can rise to the challenge of a terrier and appreciate what a gem of a dog they actually have. Dianna has worked intensively from 8am until 6pm ...in the early years 7 days a week without holidays. Over the past 5 years she has taken Mondays off for her mental health day! Without Dianna we would not have a Rescue.
Laura: June 2010 and Laura stepped forwards with Simon to adopt Arnie. Charlotte their wonderful Staffie wasn't having it and although Arnie came back Laura and Simon from that moment were hooked to support the Rescue initially fostering and adopting Tizer and then travelling to help me start up Guildford kennels, then took the lead and building the service to over 30 dogs and a strong volunteer base. Guildford kennels has now closed and Laura supports the Homing Team when she can.
Barry: Barry walked religiously for us from 2010 taking our most difficult dogs and making them into poodles! He was the fulcrum for TimmyTim and is now his foster partner and we are all so grateful for him being there for TimmyTim. We miss them both as Barry walked for over 9 years, at the kennels but TimmyTim really doesn't need to come here anymore.
Anne: 2009/10 enter Anne.. volunteered and walks with Ali & Charlie in the early days of Gatwick, South Godstone and Godstone North. Anne has walked with our dogs 4 days a week in snow; rain; hail and blistering sun. She has a free boots contract as she always wears her boots out before the guarantee so receives a free pair replacement regularly. Anne works with our entrants, and our fragile dogs and develops them with many other volunteers but Anne is always first in and works alongside the kennels staff with ease and mutual respect. Anne also takes fantastic initial photos and gives insightful lead ins for the other walkers to follow and file in behind. Everyone has such praise for Anne but there she is like the other core members in this rescue, leading from the back, not looking for praise or applause but bedded into the team and supporting so many new volunteers as they find their boots.
Peter: Peter slips in as he has donated to us for over 10 years and started to foster for us in Jan 2011. Peter has has so many fosterers now and adopted 4 dogs within this period. Peter's merry gang.
Our sweetest Pattie boy Basil
Our sweetest Pattie boy Basil
We have many many volunteers who have supported the Rescue right from its early inception. Many of them went on to home our dogs. We have had many volunteers who have got involved and played invaluable roles for years and moved away, we still remember their contribution. Many still are significantly involved, or have stepped back but still 'tune in' and financially support us through standing orders. I wanted to celebrate the key players who have been with us consistently for over 10 years and play still significant roles supporting our dogs. They have helped sooo many dogs who wouldn't have had a chance to make it through rescue, but they did. Those dogs became much loved/ adored pets and led or are still leading fulfilled lives. Our heart felt gratitude to them and their partners and continued positivity that allows our Rescue to serve so many.

I have always seen the Rescue as a massive ship which docks in at ports, delivering and receiving and sailing on. Some volunteers provide supplies, some cook & provide sustenance; others entertainment, some try to rock the boat but the ship is far too big and sturdy. The ship is sustainable and caters for all and sails on. The core crew stand firm through storms and focus on their core values and objectives to deliver their supremely valuable cargo to their forever homes, their destiny!
Buds
Buds
xxlynne
Posts: 9003
Joined: Sun Jun 01, 2014 8:01 am

Re: Rescue Remedies Diary August 2020 - October 2020

Post by xxlynne »

Footnote to above Mark our vet. Mark was there for our Rescue from 2008 when I first took a KerryBlue into his surgery. We then used him for any dogs around in the Thorton Heath area. He set up in Westerham the same time we moved to Godstone North and we began to use him from there and without Mark our Rescue would not have financially coped with the numbers of dog we are able to help. It is frightening whenever we can not get access to Mark and we have to use another vet...the vet bills are crippling and the knowledge base just isn't there. So thanks as ever to Mark and his team
xxlynne
Posts: 9003
Joined: Sun Jun 01, 2014 8:01 am

Re: Rescue Remedies Diary August 2020 - October 2020

Post by xxlynne »

Thank you for all the comments you make on how you enjoy our diary. Living within my 65th year I hope I have lost the zealous preachiness of youth and have a far more relaxed 'acceptance' of allowance of melded ideas and individualist understandings, entrenchments and sense of quest. However ethics, ethos and inclusive love for all is what I scan for. I hope all of our dogs gain the right treatment and deserved attention each with a high profile: No dog is in the background: Each one a celebrity.
Emma in spay recovery foster
Emma in spay recovery foster
In leading this Rescue we move forwards with dog centredness. The earliest lesson I was taught in dog rescue by my mentor "Our dogs have already lost their homes at least once, we need to ensure we get it so right for them now". We cannot be people pleasers at the detriment of our dog’s futures. We may be very impressed with a family’s talk and quest, but we need to be assured they can walk the walk. We can think they are great but it doesn’t mean we can or will home one of our dogs with them at this time. We know our current dogs and they are our immediate and all-consuming concern. We don’t recommend another Rescue, as the ethics of every Rescue are very different, and without an indepth working knowledge of lead thinking within that Rescue we would be karmically responsible for repercussions (I feel). Our time is centred on our dogs. Many families wait for the right dog to come in, ready in our Rescue as they know our ethics are ‘true’ and it means everything. We take the dogs with impoverished backgrounds and so need responsible families, as our dog’s lives literally depend on our getting it right.
Last week we were so celebrating our longstanding friends moving into their homes. Zippy’s homing and this week Ruby: Skyla and Bella. We have trawled countless Homing Questionnaires for each one. We have spoken with countless people who may have gone on to home another dog from us, but we or they had not felt they had the right circumstances, skills, tolerances and expectations to support homing. We knew what we were scanning for, and with these families the bright light went on. (Ruby’s home we already were talking to, but we wanted her to go on her holiday with her familiar person relax down and launch into her family from there instead of from kennels).
The homing team engage with the family and explore in depth their preparedness, life style, deal breakers, experience, and expectations. They then come to me and I knowing the dogs explore if that meets with any of our dogs needs. We build on our dog’s gifts. We look for commitment and deliver the support blanket as our dog adjusts and trusts. We discuss making sure there is scope for our dogs during their settling in period. The pace has to be right to achieve each step towards success and as the trust bond develops in those early days. We gauge the degree of handholding required within time constraints we have, together with distance factors and also explore the weakest links within the set up. We know and understand our dogs and look for families who willingly meet their needs. We are passing over our cherished one and we are looking for what I call the “Chain of care”. Our dogs are not ‘ready made’. The care is a continuum between Rescue and Forever family. Our relationship needs to be good with the receiving family so they seek our advice and we can offer help and receive our dog back should our dog need that.
Buster now in foster!!!!
Buster now in foster!!!!
We are guardians of our dogs who have suffered often:
Failure to be supported to meet their developmental milestones, as their traits emerge and put dictates on their regime. A puppy patterdale or lurcher can run and play and have a great time in their early months but as their instincts emerge their interest reaches out to track through sound, smell and sight; locate, chase, capture. Terriers are more locators: The terrier is expected to freeze the prey through barking and allow the humans to locate prey and free the terrier. Lurchers are more chasers and capturers. Genetic lines, gene mixing and situational training can inhibit their instinctual flow, allowing them to override instincts i.e. living amongst their pack cats which can be very different to alighting on a cat outside their pack/ shared territory. Being terrierrescue we so often, when talking to families who wish to relinquish their pet, are stating “But they are what it says on the tin, with a Patterdale in particular a working terrier breed, they are ‘wired’ and we talk in terms of 1st, 2nd and 3rd generation, where the 1st generation is where the parents are ‘working’. If you look at the genetic history of a terrier = Sight hound x Bullbreed. Alarm bells go off as the adult breed traits emerge!
Troy spends equal days in and equals d<br />ay out of Foster
Troy spends equal days in and equals d
ay out of Foster
Traumatizaton in engagement with human individuals, live in groups and canine relationships. Our dogs often become victims of dysfunctional families with histrionics and fear based analysis of their expression of normal canine behaviours .
Expertise applied using 'lifted' methods out of context and imposed on them without any understanding of inappropriateness, inconsistencies of approaches to each dog's temperament, breed traits and skill set++. This can be from watching a programme, TV guru or studying a particular amalgam of ‘experts’ in books. ''Qualified' individuals all have their own vision and goal oriented focus towards acceptable / appropriate / and hopefully achievable behaviour. We always say our dogs must have at least a 3 month period within the family before experts are bought in: Why because the family has to have a depth understanding and command on their dog’s instincts and together, they must as a family have worked through the bewildering period of acclimatisation into the family “settling in”. THEN there can be an exchange with each behaviourist or trainer’s particular advice. The family will sense’s it’s appropriateness with discernment, not just looking for a ‘cure’ but embracing advice within their body of knowledge and with realism. If they were to invite 3 different people in, they would be able to instinctively relate advice to their dog’s need. The expert doesn’t stand above the family they discuss and offer help teezing the assimilated realism from each family member. The family have to be the authority of their family member first. We can share the journey up until that 3 or 6 month mark but there is no substitute for the family adjusting, understanding and getting the measure of their new friend from within their own instinctive skill set.
Dog Centredness: Classic example is the difference of expert tutoring family on walking your dog : Terrierrescue dog centred approach discusses walking with your dog. I often read reports with a control focus, aiming for the handler gaining and directing a dog’s attention / dog's mental scope through treat gain. Walking to heal or without tension on the lead. Sitting on command. They can suggest all manner of equipment and activities to achieve a person centred walk. This is where there comes debate ?Is this shared with the dog’s goals. Actually how dare we say, actually this isn't natural dog behaviour. For example Terriers need to be russellers! Out there exploring the hedge rows, picking up their peemail, scanning the horizon for wild life movement. Hounds need to pick up and follow the scents and engage taking all the info they need to be able to appraise visitors within their shared territory. If the family are impressed by control, they heed this, and restrain and inhibit natural engagement. My terriers always walk like metal detectors! In truth living your life with a canine companion is about ACCOMODATION. Dogs are a different species and I don’t see anyone offering a session on how their dogs gets the best from their walk, by ensuring their handlers facilitate them to smell and trace where they want. I am often saying to families please don’t check them, let them enjoy leading on and then stopping for 3 minute intense sniff. Let them eat grass. This is their walk. Humans are about sight and social and comfort! Dog are about scent appraisal and laying, and their renewed acquaintance within their territory discovering the activities of wild life and their participation in that array and exchange.
Snowdon Henry now in foster
Snowdon Henry now in foster
Impoverished environment : Our dogs have often suffered through the use of cages, excess hours alone (Include the night time hours as well as the daytime isolation) and lack of access to a variety of inclusive activities. People closed down behind phone, TV and computer screens ignoring their needs and pushing their expression of energy back.
Henry has regular times out
Henry has regular times out
Damage due poor diet or access to healthcare, tenseness during exercise with fear based responses to normalised socialisation.
Finally Disengagement and discard into new families who don't have the integral faith in their dog’s response to life, nor understand to explain their deficits and mal adaption. They may have heavy labels layered on which weren't their fault, in fact was a normal response to the home's confusion and bewildering set of expectations on their responses. Some of our dogs we pick up from the vets or pounds where the family lacked any faith in finding them a new start

Phew… Long ramblings today. Had it on 'the go' whilst dealing with many activities. You may know (guessed) I have always suffered from dyslexia and I have to read things 3 or 4 times that I have written to pick up faults. I read what is in my head and dyslexia is like word blindness.…you have to come back to the text afresh and read it without your thought processes blurring the real text. You have to read with detachment. I can do really good proof reading but not of my own.

Dog's Weekly 64 dogs as of week-end tomorrow! (18th)
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